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Early settlers of the Isaac's Creek area

by Bob Stealey

EDITOR

Some time ago, Jean Post Rapking of Good Hope lent to the newsroom a copy of her book, "Good Hope History," which she had published by Book Masters of Mansfield, Ohio, and was copyrighted in 2002.

Mrs. Rapking resides in the Isaac's Creek community, just east of Good Hope. In a chapter of her book about Isaac's Creek, she explained that it was named for Isaac Washburn. He and Milley (Amelia) Washburn owned much of the land on Isaac's Creek in the late 18th century, she said.

"George P(f)ost came from the South Branch of the Potomac with three brothers," she wrote. "George Post was born in Germany, but when still a baby came to America with his parents."

George was married in May 1792 to Elizabeth Peterson, and in 1799 "George Post bought 120 acres from the Washburns for 120 pounds current money of Virginia."

It was nine years later that George bought some more land from the Washburns, as did his brother, Martin Post, who was married to Sarah Peterson, a sister of George's wife.

Martin, in 1829, sold his land on Isaac's Creek to George Post Jr. and relocated to Hacker's Creek.

"George and his sons bought more acreage through the years," Mrs. Rapking noted. "Family tradition reports that the third brother, William, journeyed on toward the Ohio River and was not heard from again."

The McConkeys, the Burnsides, the Sommervilles and the Yerkeys were other early families that settled on Isaac's Creek, the author said.

The house where Roscoe and Olga Washburn later resided was likely built by some of the Washburns, she said.

"It was an old house in the 1880s," wrote Mrs. Rapking. "Several families of blacksmiths lived there for a few years: David 'Davy' Scott (first place he lived when he came to Good Hope); the Smith family, and Daniel 'Dan' Starkey."

She said George Washburn acquired property and soon afterward built a small house at the forks of Isaac's Creek and the county road (later U.S. 19) for the Starkeys. Dan Starkey had his blacksmith shop on the edge of the property, facing the Isaac's Creek Road.

In Friday's column, I'll resume my mini-recounting of some of the early settlers of southern Harrison County.