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White House going too far with royal treatment

Nothing against Tony Stewart, but ...

Doesn't President Bush have more important things to do -- like fighting terrorism or fixing the economy -- than to spend time honoring NASCAR's "bad-boy" champion?

After all, this is the same Tony Stewart who was placed on probation after punching a photographer, and also was fined by NASCAR and his sponsor over the incident.

This is the same Tony Stewart who had to apologize for bumping another photographer last month.

And it's the same Tony Stewart who had to be restrained during an argument with a NASCAR official in 2001.

Tony Stewart is a great driver. But that shouldn't earn him a seat at the White House.

The same holds true for champions of other sports who end up at the most famous address in America.

The White House is, indeed, the people's house. But Tony Stewart and other sports figures are only getting a red-carpet trip inside because they can bring votes home to the resident, or, should I say, the president.

Think about it for a minute. Should Tony Stewart or Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett Favre get the same treatment at the White House as someone who makes a significant breakthrough in science, or someone who wins the Medal of Honor?

Hardly.

If the president wants to call a championship team and wish them well, fine. But setting aside time to meet with sports figures like Tony Stewart in the White House is going too far.

Matt Harvey