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CURRENT STORIES


Historical Headlines

by Diane Davis

Correspondent

CLARKSBURG -- It was the last week of August 1928.

In Paris, representatives of 15 nations signed the pact renouncing the use of war to settle differences. Secretary Kellogg of the United States was the second to sign. The first was Dr. Gustav Streseman of Germany.

At least 14 people died in a subway accident in New York City during rush hour on Friday, Aug. 24. One hundred and one passengers were injured. The ninth car of a 10-car train bound for Brooklyn ripped through a concrete partition and was torn in two. Officials blamed a faulty switch near Times Square.

Five special trains carried 3,000 Hope employees to Marietta, Ohio, for the annual Hope picnic. Speed boat races were featured at the event. It was estimated that there were over 12,000 people in attendance.

A former Clarksburg police detective was shot through the abdomen by Clarksburg police officers when he was apprehended breaking into the back of the O.J. Morrison store. He shot an officer in the hand and hip before being subdued and arrested. He was taken to St. Mary's Hospital to recuperate.

Stores were advertising the newest fashion trends for fall. Parsons-Souders millinery department featured the new "dip to the right" hats. The ads stated that "either the right side is longer or the trim is massed on that side." The hats, in velvet, velour, felt, or plush, were priced from $5 to $10. Brown or blue were the favored colors; medium brims or turban effects were the favored styles. Hartley Rownd's advertisements advised women that "the fashion correct fall wardrobe will contain at least one frock of black satin or crepe." The dresses sold for $17.75.

Moore's Opera House was showing Ramon Novarro in "Forbidden Hours." The Ritz, in addition to showing the film "The Good-bye Kiss," was featuring vaudeville acts, including singing and dancing Russian Cossacks. The Robinson Grand was advertising "the most phenomenal event in the history of motion pictures." Moviegoers could see Al Smith, the Democratic candidate for president, deliver his acceptance speech from Albany. The ad stated, "As he accepts in Albany, you will see and hear his speech on the screen at the Grand."

It was the last week of August 1953.

One hundred fifty American POWs were released at Panmunjon, the largest single day release. These prisoners, who shouted and danced upon their release, were from Camp l, at Chongsong, the stockade for "incorrigibles" on the Yalu River.

The U.S. Commissioner of Education announced that three out of five school classrooms suffered overcrowding.

A 24-hour strike by long distance telephone workers ended on Saturday, Aug. 29. The strike, which began in Maryland, idled 22,000 workers nationwide, including 3,500 in West Virginia.

State Auditor Edgar B. Sims sent a letter to state employees stating that "I refuse to spend taxpayers money for 'leg shows.'" He stated new regulations were being placed into effect that would prohibit paying for conventions which included floor shows. Membership dues for associations for amusement, entertainment, recreation and personal improvement of employees would not qualify for payment. Governor Marland disagreed with the hard line taken by Sims on travel and memberships, but Sims stood by his position, saying, "Watch my smoke."

A decision, awaited since May, was handed down in the fight for control of Clarksburg City Hall by Judge DeBerry. He ruled that A. Page Lockard, who replaced Frank Wiseman as city manager, was found to be "usurping power and intruding into City Hall." Judge DeBerry also dissolved the injunction, which Lockard had obtained in Charleston, allowing him to take office, but granted 30 days for the preparation of an appeal to the state Supreme Court.

Clarksburg sweltered through nine days of a heat wave, with temperatures at or near l00 degrees. There seemed to be no relief in sight. The forecast for Monday, Aug. 31 was 102 degrees. The drought in West Virginia was the worst in 20 years.

Dr. B. S. Brake was named director of the City-County Health Department.

The Sport Shop was preparing for bow and arrow hunting season, which would begin on Sept. 15.

The Robinson Grand featured H.G. Wells' "War of the Worlds." Snyder's Drive-In showed "Titanic," with Clifton Webb and Barbara Stanwyck. Warner's Skyline headlined Ethel Merman, Donald O'Connor and Vera-Ellen in "Call Me Madam," and Rhonda Fleming starred at the Orpheum in "Little Egypt." The Ritz offered Kathryn Grayson in "So This Is Love." Moore's Opera House showed "The Stars Are Singing," starring Rosemary Clooney.