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Clarksburg
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P.O. Box 2002,
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CURRENT STORIES


Is it the death of 'supersizing'?

by Bob Stealey

EDITOR

At least one fast-food chain restaurant has vowed to halt the practice of "supersizing," and to me, it's about time.

My word, in one ear we've been hearing all about how obese our young Americans are becoming, and in the other ear, when we step in one of those places, virtually all we can hear is one or more of the clerks asking, "And did you want to supersize your order, Sir?"

Decisions, decisions!

Now, perhaps, our brains won't get so stressed out trying to make up our minds.

For me, it's no contest, because I've stopped eating even the regular-size burgers and fries. Yeah, I still order the large diet pops sometimes, but no milk shakes or other delicious treats.

Even the company that provides medical/health insurance for state employees is getting into the act.

Tom Susman, the director of the West Virginia Public Employees Insurance Agency, has applauded McDonald's Restaurants for their decision to phase out the supersize portions from the menu. But on the side of caution, he said he's waiting to see what will REPLACE the super size items.

He hopes the idea is "catching" and that other fast-food chains will follow suit.

"With the rising level of childhood obesity, we hope fast-food chains will offer fresh fruit and low-fat milk as default menu items in children's meals," Susman said.

That sounds good to me.


Not to start a bunch of trash talk, but can anyone reading Bob'n'Along today recall the city garbage dump when it was located on the north side of what was then U.S. 50 (now Bridgeport Hill Road)? What do you remember about it?

Further, for those whose minds I've challenged with those questions, can you remember how waste was disposed, after the garbage trucks picked it up, around 1950 and before?

Carol Schweiker called me recently, prompting those questions. She commented that even though today there are more modern methods of waste containment for neighborhoods, the streets aren't nearly as clean and tidy as they were a half century or more ago.

Golly, I think she has a good point there!

If you're able to answer any or all of the above questions, you can contact Schweiker at 842-4336, and/or you could send them to me -- e-mail or snail mail ONLY, no phone calls, please -- and I'll use the information in a future column. Also, if anyone would have a photo or photos of the old waste disposal sites for "A Look Back in Time," I can use those, too.

Have a beautiful weekend!

Editor Bob Stealey can be reached by phone at (304) 626-1438, or by e-mail at rstealey@exponent-telegram.com. The mailing address is: c/o The Exponent Telegram, P.O. Box 2000, Clarksburg, WV 26302-2000.